One in three office workers log into work on Christmas Day

Forget putting your feet up over the festive season. One in three office workers check their work emails, even on Christmas Day.

That’s the finding from a new study, of 1,000 employees in the UK, which also found that 47% of those surveyed expect to work and check email on Christmas Eve.

The research also revealed that one in five office workers and business executives expect to log on to work every day of the Christmas holidays. And of these, seven per cent said they would be logging on multiple times a day.

Reasons why

When asked why they were prepared to break off from the festivities to work, 14 per cent said they worked during the holidays because they were bored and 15 per cent said that working gave them an excuse to get away from the family for a short while. While flicking through your work emails might allow you a quick break from the relatives, the results may also shine a light on the ‘always on’ work culture. Nearly half of those responding to the survey said it they didn’t find it relaxing if they didn’t know what was happening at work. And 40 per cent said it was vital they knew what happening at work – a further ten per cent said they didn’t need a complete break over Christmas, as they enjoyed work.

Pressure culture?

However, it isn’t always about choosing to work or using work as a convenient excuse to duck out of family activities. A third of workers felt it was ‘expected’ of them to work over the holidays, 35 per cent said clients expected them to be available and 36 per cent said their colleagues expected it of them.

It would also appear that more than a third of workers felt it was expected of them to work during the festive period. 35% said that their clients expect them to be available over Christmas and 36% said other colleagues expected it of them. 34% said they expected their colleagues also to work over Christmas.

While 40% of those surveyed felt they were being conscientious by logging on over the festive period, others say they do it simply to show others how hard they are working, according to the research carried out by TLF Research for tech firm eShare.

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